Surfing and Global Community - We can make it better... together!

I like surfing.  Maybe you do also. True confession, not so much with the help of a surfboard, I’m not that good.  But bodysurfing in the ocean near shore, there is nothing like it.  There are factors more powerful than you in play, and the ride is exhilarating.  Ok, sudden stops can hurt, but usually, it’s worth the risk.

 

Teams at work counting on you.

Further truth be told, I have had more of that experience in the air than water.1  I had the privilege of 45 years ago serving my country as a Navy pilot for a few years.  In a prop or jet, there are way more powerful forces at work than you, but as you exert (limited) control, the ride is amazing.  And again worth the risk.

Interestingly, how do we as individuals get to the place where we can experience this kind of joy and exhilaration in our lives and in our work. The only way is to know the difference between the factors beyond and those within our control and artfully … mix them together.  Like in bodysurfing (where I learned from experience and from others) and in flying (where I depended on those who maintained the aircraft and those who instructed me), it takes a team to be successful.

 

CED Teams at 2 Years

As I reflect on our last two years together in CED as your Board Chair, and leaning on Yadin’s visionary statement: Together, we can …, it’s been quite a ride with you.2-8  Actually, it’s been amazing! First, let’s look at the what’s … and then add the how’s … of what we have done:

We have increased our …

  • Identification, Engagement, and Education & Leadership Training: through global recognition and CE contributions: our CED Webinars, Regional HT meetings, and Global CE Journal in collaboration with the World Health Organization have brought us internally linked to 50 national CE societies and 140 countries, and externally has given us a Voice with government leaders across many of WHO’s 194 member states, as well as many of the other professional organizations and NGOs that support them. The WHO-CED COVID19 Townhalls in May brought registrants from 97 countries. 
  • Professional Standing, Telehealth & Policy, Regulation: our history and ongoing work in these areas made us focused and competent and has bolstered our Voice & CE impact on patient outcomes.

 

How have we done this?

  • Built Trust and Provided Communications: Through Kallirroi (Secretariat), and Luis (Webmaster/Social Media) and You (board members, collaborators and global CEs & others) presenting our profession on various Social Media & WhatsApp channels in various languages. The ride here is fast, with many changes happening daily. We ask questions, offer solutions, celebrate with one another, and mourn and lament both colleagues, family members, and our countries in crises when appropriate. We care and it shows.
  • Global Community: In short, as one of my favorite CEs (Tobey Clark) said this week, we have become … Global Community, a family that cares for one another9-10.

 

Clearly there are many factors at work beyond our control in global Clinical Engineering

  • But if we can continue to search ways to stand together, help each other, and use our Voice and the Global Platform we have created, both individually and as a group, we can continue to innovate and lead change for the use of optimal healthcare technology …
  • … that improves the health and wellness of all of our families and all of our communities.

 

What a joy and what a privilege!

IFMBE Clinical Engineering Division Chairman Tom Judd

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Footnotes:

1Aha Moment Blog, March 2019

2Global History of CE-HTM up to 2015 article

3CE Success Story 2018 article

4CED Update Blog, March 2019

5Rome presentations & programs, October 2019

6Tom Judd & Yadin David Presentation for Japan/JACE re CED Response to COVID19

7Yadin David & Tom Judd on the occasion of ACCE’s 30th Anniversary – citing CED global platform, June 2020

8CED 2020 Webinars, June 2020

9Global Community typical web definition

10Global Community typical explanation: Connie Sobon Sensor, PhD, RN


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